Monday, 14 May 2012

Tell Me, Would You Come To Spain?


SCENARIO
Imagine you are talking to a relative, a friend or a colleague. Maybe you both study Spanish together. The other person is thinking about visiting Spain and is wondering if you would consider going with him/ her. He/ she could say to you something like: "tell me, would you come to Spain with me?".

In Spanish, he/ she could choose to be less formal and say to you:
Dime, ¿irías a España conmigo?

On the other hand, he/ she could choose to be more formal and say to you:
Dígame, ¿iría (usted) a España conmigo?


OUR TIP
The question is an invitation for you to state whether you would consider doing something at some time in the future. When you say what you might to do in the future, you DO NOT need to be concerned about the level of formality in the other person's question. Your main concern should be about communicating what you would do. Perhaps you want to say:

    1. What you would do (simply and without conditions);

Here are some examples of what you could say in that case:
  • Sí, podría ir a España contigo (yes, I could go to Spain with you);
  • No me importaría ir a España contigo (I would not mind going to Spain with you);
  • No, no puedo ir a España (no, I can't go to Spain);

    2. What you would do IF certain conditions* applied;

Here are some examples of what you could say in that case:
  • Sí, podría ir contigo si no fueramos a España en avión (yes, I could go with you if we didn't travel by plane to Spain);
  • Sí, podría ir contigo si no fuesemos a España en avión (yes, I could go with you if we didn't travel by plane to Spain);
  • Sí, si no fueramos a España en avión podría ir contigo (yes, I could go with you if we didn't travel by plane to Spain);
  • Sí, si no fuesemos a España en avión podría ir contigo (yes, I could go with you if we didn't travel by plane to Spain);

Now you should practice replying to someone who says to you:
Dime, ¿irías a España conmigo?

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*Please see grammar below

Grammar-Conditional Sentences
Conditional sentences may be used when dealing with the outcomes of hypothetical events or actions, when such hypothetical events or actions are the conditions required for a given result. Conditional sentences may be considered in the following three scenarios:

    1. Firm conditions
This scenario refers to situations where a conditional outcome will result from a hypothetical action or event. This type of condition is usually expressed as:
  • IF <something happens> THEN...
  • IF <something doesn't happen> THEN...
  • IF <someone does something> THEN...
  • IF <someone doesn't do something> THEN...
  • <something will happen> IF...
  • <something won't happen> IF...
  • <someone will do something> IF
  • <someone won't do something> IF

This type of condition is usually expressed in Spanish as follows:
  • Si <present indicative>... <present indicative>...
  • <present indicative>... Si <present indicative>...
  • Si <present indicative>... <future>...
  • <future>... Si <present indicative>...
  • Si <present indicative>... <imperative>...
  • <imperative>... Si <present indicative>...

Some examples of conditional sentences of this type are
  • Si llueve no voy a la la playa (if it rains I am not going to the beach);
  • No voy a la la playa si llueve (I am not going to the beach if it rains);
  • Si quieres iremos al cine (if you want we'll go to the cinema);
  • Iremos al cine si quieres (we'll go to the cinema if you want);
  • Si hace frío no salgas (in it is cold don't go out);
  • No salgas si hace frío (don't go out if it is cold);

2. 'Probable'/ 'Likely' conditions
This scenario refers to situations where a conditional outcome would/ should result from a hypothetical action or event. This type of condition is usually expressed as:
  • IF <something happened> THEN...
  • IF <something didn't happen> THEN...
  • IF <someone did something> THEN...
  • IF <someone didn't do something> THEN...
  • <something may happen> IF...
  • <something may not happen> IF...
  • <someone may do something> IF...
  • <someone may not do something> IF...

This type of condition is usually expressed in Spanish as follows:
  • Si <imperfect subjunctive>... <conditional>...
  • <conditional> Si … <imperfect subjunctive>...

Some examples of conditional sentences of this type are
  • Si lloviera no iría a la la playa (if it rained I would not go to the beach);
  • No iría a la la playa si lloviera (I would not go to the beach if it rained);
  • Si lloviese no iría a la la playa (if it rained I would not go to the beach);
  • No iría a la la playa si lloviese (I would not go to the beach if it rained);
  • Si quiseras te llamaría (if you wanted I would call you);
  • Te llamaría si quisieras (I would call you if wou wanted);
  • Si quiseses te llamaría (if you wanted I would call you);
  • Te llamaría si quisieses (I would call you if wou wanted);

3. Impossible conditions.
This scenario refers to situations where a conditional outcome would/ should have resulted from a hypothetical past action or event. This type of condition is usually expressed as:
  • IF <something had happened> THEN...
  • IF <something hadn't happen> THEN...
  • IF <someone had done something> THEN...
  • IF <someone hadn't done something> THEN...
  • <something would have happened> IF...
  • <something would not have happened> IF...
  • <someone would have done something> IF
  • <someone would not have done something> IF

This type of condition is usually expressed in Spanish as follows:
  • Si <pluperfect subjunctive>... <conditional perfect>...
  • <conditional perfect>... Si <pluperfect subjunctive>...

Some examples of conditional sentences of this type are
  • Si hubiera llovido no habría ido a la la playa (had it rained I would not have gone to the beach);
  • No habría ido a la la playa si hubiera llovido (I would not have gone to the beach if it had rained);
  • Si hubiese llovido no habría ido a la la playa (had it rained I would not have gone to the beach);
  • No habría ido a la la playa si hubiese llovido (I would not have gone to the beach if it had rained);
  • Si me hubieras llamado habría venido (if you had called me I would have come);
  • Habría venido si me hubieras llamado (I would have come if you had called me);
  • Si me hubieses llamado habría venido (if you had called me I would have come);
  • Habría venido si me hubieses llamado (I would have come if you had called me);


Now you should practice “firm”, “probable” and “imposible” conditional sentences with some examples of your own.


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